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Our core activities focus on working with two separate childrens’ homes, one in Kathmandu, Nepal (The Hope Centre) and one in Kalimpong, India (Hornbeam House) that together provide shelter, education and loving care currently for 46 children. All of the children are disadvantaged because they are either orphaned, abandoned or disabled. They are of Nepali origin and come from some of the poorest hill communities in the Nepalese and Indian Himalayas. Without our help they would have little hope for the future. The homes also provide full-time employment for about 10 adults, some of whom also have physical disabilities. What sets us apart is that because we are so closely involved with the NGOs and local partnerships, we know each and every one of our children, by name, and what makes them happy in life.

We also support the Bhaktaphur Mothers Group in Kathmandu, Nepal which is a self-help group caring for children with cerebral palsy. It is part of the umbrella organisation, Cerebral Palsy Nepal, which is Nepal’s only non-governmental and non-profit organization dedicated to supporting people with cerebral palsy and their families. We provide top-up funding to assist with new therapies and resources, changes in accommodation and resource provision. This is a self-funding group many of whose clients are unable to pay in full for the service.

The Hope Centre

The Hope Centre is home to 35 children and two live-in house parents. It is located on the outskirts of Kathmandu, Nepal, and is run by the Disabled Welfare Association (DWA), one of our operational NGO partners in Nepal.

The Hope Centre is dedicated to providing a home environment for very needy, disabled and orphaned children and aims to help each child lead an independent life at some point in the future. It does this by providing them with a full home environment, education, medical care, and love.

How we help

We provide most of the funds needed to run the Hope Centre, this includes schooling (specialist where necessary), medical and surgical, transportation, food and clothing costs. We support the salaries of the 8 staff who work at the Centre, including the two live-in house parents as well as all the planned and preventative maintenance costs for the building and property.

One of the other things we do is provide advice and guidance to the DWA in areas such as child medical welfare and building infrastructure projects.

Tilak Shrestha, General Manager says, “New Futures Nepal has been fully supporting the DWA since 2003 and many disabled and orphaned children have been leading their life from darkness to light.”

Hornbeam House

Hornbeam House is home to 11 children and 3 live-in house parents. It’s located in the town of Kalimpong, West Bengal, India, and is run by the Hope Family Trust, our operational NGO partner in India. The Hope Family Trust runs Hornbeam House and many other local projects and believes that every person needs and deserves to have hope. Kiran Chettri, Managing Trustee, says, “In this world of suffering, there are many unfortunate situations in which people lose hope. They become helpless through death, sickness, poverty or war.” Their team of staff and volunteers are eager to help those people by delivering sustainable high-impact, community-based services to the poor and needy. The Hope Family Trust is an independent, government registered NGO with the simple aim of “transforming lives to bring hope to the hopeless”.

How we help
We provide all of the funds needed to entirely run Hornbeam House. Initially, this included the funding needed to build the new house the family moved into in 2015, which enabled the Hope Family Trust to be able to provide long-term care for orphans in Kalimpong.

On a day to day basis, we also provide the funding for the schooling, medical, food and clothing costs for all the children as well as the staff salaries.

Lastly, we also provide advice and guidance to Hope Family Trust in the area of building infrastructure projects.

Bhaktaphur Mothers Group

The Bhaktaphur Mothers Group is a self-help group caring for children with cerebral palsy. It’s part of the umbrella organisation, Cerebral Palsy Nepal, which is Nepal’s only non-governmental and non-profit organization dedicated to supporting people with cerebral palsy and their families. Despite the excellent progress they have made, they are only scratching the surface of what remains a chronic, under-resourced problem in Nepal.

Cerebral palsy (CP) is a neurological disorder that involves damage to the brain such that many sufferers have a range of problems which vary in severity. These often include mobility issues, speech difficulties, developmental delay, learning difficulties,  and seizures. Cerebral Palsy is not a genetic disorder; the injury to the brain often occurs prior to birth, during birth or soon after. There is no cure for Cerebral Palsy although timely therapeutic interventions  can significantly improve function and enhance quality of life for those affected.  In Nepal, especially in remote areas, it is hard to access the support and medical help required. This, coupled with extreme poverty, lack of education and social, cultural beliefs concerning disability means many children do not receive the help needed. Cerebral Palsy is referred to by many as "Nepal's hidden catastrophe"

The work of Cerebral Palsy Nepal and other agencies is vital in raising awareness of the condition, improving access to therapeutic interventions and in changing social and cultural beliefs and attitudes towards disability.

How we help
We provide top-up funding to help with new therapies and resources, changes in accommodation, resource provision, and increasing the numbers of mothers or families able to attend this support centre. It’s a self-funding group many of whose members or visitors are unable to pay in full for the service. This is where we come in.

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